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10 of the Most Creative Houses around the World
May 12th, 2014

Why buy off a plan when you can build your home to look like a shoe?

They were our thoughts when we had a browse through some of the most creative homes located around the world. Here are our favourite top ten. Which ones are your favourite?

1. The Nautilus (Mexico City)

Otherwise known as the ‘Seashell House’, this home in Mexico was created for a young family who simply wanted  to live in something unconventional. The resulting home was designed by architect Javier Senosiain of Arquitectura Organica in 2006, who channelled inspiration from the works of Gaudi and Frank Lloyd Wright to create this ‘bio-architecture’ masterpiece.

Image from http://www.demilked.com

Image from http://www.demilked.com

The house reflects a crustaceans shell and features a colourful mosaic front. Smooth and natural looking protrusions dominate the walls, while stone paths bordered by vegetation cover the interior floors. The eco friendly atmosphere is complete with the addition of an artificial stream that runs throughout the home.

2. Surreal Lawn House (Frohnleiten, Austria)

The surreal lawn house in Frohnleiten, Austria is exactly that – a house covered in a soft synthetic grass. Along side the walls of lawn lie randomly placed staircases, as well as large white windows coupled with more windows.

Image from http://www.lludus.com

Image from http://www.lludus.com

The house is often coined a unique, but visually calming structure that aspires to reflect a connection between nature and architecture.  The creative abode was the collaborative effort of Reinhold Weichlbauer and Albert Josef Ortis of Weichlbauer Ortis Architects. 

3. The ‘Steel House’ (Lubbock, Texas)

The Steel House is the work of artist and architect Robert Bruno. He began this piece in 1974 with a vision to create a living space that reflected both animal and machine. The home was under construction for 35 years until Robert confirmed its completion. The weight of the home is estimated at 110 tonnes.

Image from http://www.thegrumpyoldlimey.com

Image from http://www.thegrumpyoldlimey.com

4. Water Tower turned Home (Belgium)

This tower in Belgium served as a water tower and a Nazi hideout during the second World War, before it was converted into a trendy living space in 2007.

Image from http://www.demilked.com

Image from http://www.demilked.com

The home is 100ft tall and features an outdoor shower with panoramic views over the Belgium town, Steenokkerzeel.

5. The Mushroom House (Cincinnati, Ohio)

This eye-catching peice of real estate was designed by renowned architecture professor, Terry Brown, who also lived and worked in this space. The house comprises of wave-like wood work, copper ceilings and a spiral staircase entry. The interior walls are cladded with various materials such as cut glass, sea shells, ceramics and an assortment of metals.

Image from http://www.houselogic.com

Image from http://www.houselogic.com

6. Stone House (Portugal)

Located in the Fafe mountains in northern Portgual, the Stone House comprises of four large boulders connected together via a concrete mix. The house features many common amenities, such as a swimming pool and fire place, both carved into the rock.

Image from http://www.archdaily.com/

Image from http://www.archdaily.com/

It’s unique and rustic appearance has attracted thousands of visitors from all around the globe since its construction in 1974.

7. Klein Bottle House (Mornington Peninsula, Australia)

Designed as a beach house, the Klein Bottle house is a architectural masterpiece. The home is based on the mathematical concept of the Klein Bottle, bearing a spiral configuration that passes back through itself.

Image from http://www.domaindesign.com.au

Image from http://www.domaindesign.com.au

Both the exterior and interior reflect a series of orthogonal and abstract geometrical forms that create unique and dramatic spaces throughout the home. The movement of space follows a red stair case that connects branching rooms and guides the resident up to the highest point of the home.

8. 222 House (Pembrokeshire, Wales)

Sunken into the ground and hidden by a turf covered roof, 222 House is almost unnoticeable in its National Park location along the Southwest coast of Wales. The only giveaway is the glass panels facing towards the ocean.

The home has existed since 1994 and has virtually no impact on the surrounding natural habitats. Its underground design also provides natural geothermal insulation during the winter months.

Image from https://flipside.theiet.org

Image from https://flipside.theiet.org

9. The Shoe House (Mpumalanga, South Africa)

The Shoe House is the ornate creation from entrepeneur and artist, Ron Van Zyl. The house, which was originally constructed in 1990 for Van Zyl’s wife Yvonne, reflects a brown boot complete with laces and a tongue.  The home is actually 3 stories, with the first level located underground.

Image from www.roomsforafrica.com

Image from www.roomsforafrica.com

Today the shoe houses a collection of Van Zyl’s wood and rock works. Its surroundings have also been refurbished to include a guest house, restaurant, bar and  pool, making it quite the attractive location for many tourists.

10. The ‘Fish House’ (Berkley, California)

The Fish House in Berkley, California is another home that draws on sea side creativity. In fact, the house is said to embody the features of a tardigade – a microscopic animal found in water and damp moss, that is renowned for being the worlds most indestructible creature. It’s not surprising then that architect Eugene Tsui, assures the house (which is built for his parents) is fire proof, earthquake proof, flood proof and termite proof.

Image from http://www.weather.com

Image from http://www.weather.com

Internationally considered the world’s safest house, the home features a reinforced concrete foundation that sinks 1.5 meters into the ground in certain areas. The walls are made of a combination of recycled styrofoam and  cement blocks called ‘Rastrablock’ – a material impervious to water, fire and termites, and that reduces sound by up to 50 decibels.

CBS Property Group

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